The Atrium Clinic

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Aftercare Instructions

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Instructions after Extractions and/or Bone Grafting

Extractions

Following removal of a tooth or teeth, the tooth socket is debrided and the adjacent soft tissue is reopposed and sutured. Subsequent to this, the socket fills up with blood, which clots and seals off the bony walls. It is important that this clot remains intact and is not removed by rinsing too vigorously or traumatizing the area. A bone graft may have been placed to maintain as much ridge volume as possible, or to augment the existing ridge. Keeping the area free of infection during the first weeks of healing is critical. It is important that medications are taken as prescribed.

 

Bleeding

DO NOT disturb the wound

DO NOT rinse too vigorously for the first two days as disruption of the clot may occur.

AVOID hot foods or fluids until the second day following the surgery.

DO NOT drink through a straw, as it could dislodge the clot.

 

Keep your head elevated (above your heart). This will help keep the swelling down to a minimum. Don’t be concerned if traces of blood are noted in the saliva for several hours after the operation. Excessive bleeding can be controlled by biting on gauze placed directly on the wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues, you may rinse your mouth with ice cold water and bite on a moist teabag.

 

If bleeding persists, please contact our office for further information.

 

Sutures

Avoid interfering with any sutures that have been placed. Gently rinse the area with the prescribed mouthwash or warm salt water to keep the sutures free of plaque and food debris. The sutures are usually removed in 8-10 days.

 

Pain

The degree of discomfort experienced post-op varies greatly on an individual basis. Most discomfort can be controlled by 400-600mg of Ibuprofen taken every 6-8 hours. If this proves to be inadequate, a prescription for a stronger analgesic may be issued and should be used as directed. Clenching and grinding is the most common cause of pain post-operatively.

 

Swelling

In some cases, swelling is to be expected. To help alleviate this, ice packs may be applied to the face over the area of the surgery for ten minutes on and ten minutes off for the balance of the day and all of the second day. Ice cubes in a plastic bag can serve as an ice pack. If swelling and discomfort persist, warm, wet compresses and warm salt water rinses may be used over the area on the third and subsequent days. If possible, an elevated headrest (or extra pillow) should be used during the first two nights after the operation in order to reduce swelling. Flying within a few days of surgery is associated with greater risks of swelling and post-operative complications.

 

If any excessive spongy swelling occurs over the site, please contact our office for further information.

 

Oral Hygiene

The success of the surgical procedure is greatly dependent on maintaining meticulous oral hygiene. In the first week following surgery, you will be required to gently rinse the surgical site with the prescribed mouthwash. Peridex/Periogard prevents plaque from forming and you should use this rinse as often as you eat, thus preventing debris from lodging around the sutures.

 

After a few weeks of use, you may note a slight staining of the teeth, like tea or coffee stain. This is a side-effect of using the mouthwash and can be easily removed. You may also note altered taste sensation that usually lasts 1-2 weeks.

 

Elsewhere throughout the mouth, you can use a toothbrush, etc, taking great care not to overlap on to the surgical site.

 

Once the dressing has been removed, meticulous plaque control will be necessary to ensure uneventful wound healing and prevent the development of root sensitivity. Proxabrushes and soft toothbrushes should be used immediately after the dressing has been removed.

 

Antibiotics

Antibiotics may be prescribed depending on the surgical procedure. It is important that these antibiotics be taken completely as directed.

 

Nutrition

It is necessary to maintain an high protein diet after surgery. Your diet should however be of very soft foods – i.e. nothing that you can hear yourself chew. Chew small pieces of food on the non-operated side of your jaw. Stay on a soft food diet for at least two weeks after surgery, and avoid spicy foods. Keep yourself hydrated, drinking a glass of water every hour. DO NOT use a straw.

 

Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity following surgery is usually related to an inadequate level of plaque control. After the sutures have been removed, you can re-introduce a soft toothbrush and use interdental cleaning aides with great care. Do not use an electric brush or other mechanical device. Individuals that have a tendancy to grind their teeth should be aware that grinding or clenching following a surgical procedure might also give rise to considerable discomfort.

 

How to assist the healing response

1. Maintain meticulous oral hygiene

2. Refrain from smoking

3. Attempt to maintain a high protein diet

4. Avoid vigorous exercise

5. Get as much rest as possible

 

Questions or Concerns

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our office for further information.

 

Instructions after Implant Surgery

Bleeding

DO NOT disturb the wound

DO NOT rinse too vigorously for the first two days as disruption of the clot may occur.

AVOID hot foods or fluids until the second day following the surgery.

DO NOT drink through a straw, as it could dislodge the clot.

 

Keep your head elevated (above your heart). This will help keep the swelling down to a minimum. Don’t be concerned if traces of blood are noted in the saliva for several hours after the operation. Excessive bleeding can be controlled by biting on gauze placed directly on the wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues, you may rinse your mouth with ice cold water and bite on a moist teabag.

 

If bleeding persists, please contact our office for further information.

 

Appliances

Dentures or other appliances should not be worn for the first two weeks following implant placement. Undue pressure on the implants during the initial stages of healing may compromise the integration with the bone. After two weeks, the dentures can be relieved over the implant site(s) and worn until the final restorations are placed.

 

Pain

The degree of discomfort experienced post-op varies greatly on an individual basis. Most discomfort can be controlled by 400-600mg of Ibuprofen taken every 6-8 hours. If this proves to be inadequate, a prescription for a stronger analgesic may be issued and should be used as directed. Clenching and grinding is the most common cause of pain post-operatively.

 

Swelling

In some cases, swelling is to be expected. To help alleviate this, ice packs may be applied to the face over the area of the surgery for ten minutes on and ten minutes off for the balance of the day and all of the second day. Ice cubes in a plastic bag can serve as an ice pack. If swelling and discomfort persist, warm, wet compresses and warm salt water rinses may be used over the area on the third and subsequent days. If possible, an elevated headrest (or extra pillow) should be used during the first two nights after the operation in order to reduce swelling. Flying within a few days of surgery is associated with greater risks of swelling and post-operative complications.

 

If any excessive spongy swelling occurs over the site, please contact our office for further information.

 

Oral Hygiene

The success of the surgical procedure is greatly dependent on maintaining meticulous oral hygiene. In the first week following surgery, you will be required to gently rinse the surgical site with the prescribed mouthwash. Peridex/Periogard prevents plaque from forming and you should use this rinse as often as you eat, thus preventing debris from lodging around the sutures.

 

After a few weeks of use, you may note a slight staining of the teeth, like tea or coffee stain. This is a side-effect of using the mouthwash and can be easily removed. You may also note altered taste sensation that usually lasts 1-2 weeks.

 

Elsewhere throughout the mouth, you can use a toothbrush, etc, taking great care not to overlap on to the surgical site.

 

Antibiotics

Antibiotics may be prescribed depending on the surgical procedure. It is important that these antibiotics be taken completely as directed.

 

Nutrition

It is necessary to maintain a high protein diet after surgery. Your diet should however be of very soft foods – i.e. nothing that you can hear yourself chew. Chew small pieces of food on the non-operated side of your jaw. Stay on a soft food diet for at least two weeks after surgery, and avoid spicy foods. Keep yourself hydrated, drinking a glass of water every hour. DO NOT use a straw.

 

Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity following surgery is usually related to an inadequate level of plaque control. After the sutures have been removed, you can re-introduce a soft toothbrush and use interdental cleaning aides with great care. Do not use an electric brush or other mechanical device. Individuals that have a tendancy to grind their teeth should be aware that grinding or clenching following a surgical procedure might also give rise to considerable discomfort.

 

How to assist the healing response

1. Maintain meticulous oral hygiene

2. Refrain from smoking

3. Attempt to maintain a high protein diet

4. Avoid vigorous exercise

5. Get as much rest as possible

 

Questions or Concerns

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our office for further information.